Visit the main CICH web site »

Contextual Module

Children and Youth in Canada - The Context of their Lives (module table of contents)

Section 4: Economic Inequities (section table of contents)


Implications

In every province except Newfoundland, the welfare1 income of a lone parent with one child is below the poverty line. With the rising cost of food and the nearly unaffordable cost of housing, many families continue to struggle to balance their budgets each month.2

1Welfare income for a lone parent with a child aged two includes basic social assistance, other provincial benefits, federal child benefits, provincial child benefits, provincial child benefits, GST credit.
2“Campaign 2000, 2011 Report Card on Child and Family Poverty in Canada.”  Accessed on June 29, 2012 at http://www.campaign2000.ca/reportCards/national/2011EnglishRreportCard.pdf.

In 2010, 8% of all children in Canada and 22% of children living in female lone-parent families were living in poverty. Prince Edward Island and New Brunswick had the lowest rates of child poverty overall. In PEI, 2% of all children and youth lived in poverty, which was the case for 3% of New Brunswick’s children and youth. In New Brunswick, 10% of children and youth living with female lone parents lived in poverty. Manitoba and British Columbia had the highest rates of child poverty in Canada. In both Manitoba and British Columbia, 11% of all children and youth lived in poverty. In Manitoba, 36% of children and youth living with female lone parents lived in poverty.



Be part of the Profile network

To receive updates on new content, events, resources and much more.

Share us with your social network
CICH Profile

This page is only one section of the CICH Profile. For more interesting data
on children and youth visit http://profile.cich.ca